An analysis of the hardships in the novel grapes of wrath by john steinbeck

Themes are the fundamental and often universal ideas explored in a literary work. Historical, social, and economic circumstances separate people into rich and poor, landowner and tenant, and the people in the dominant roles struggle viciously to preserve their positions. In his brief history of California in Chapter 19, Steinbeck portrays the state as the product of land-hungry squatters who took the land from Mexicans and, by working it and making it produce, rendered it their own. Now, generations later, the California landowners see this historical example as a threat, since they believe that the influx of migrant farmers might cause history to repeat itself.

An analysis of the hardships in the novel grapes of wrath by john steinbeck

He deplores their neglect of the land that resulted in the Dust Bowl and which helped to exacerbate the Great Depression. The book is interestingly structured. These interchapters contain the philosophical material of the book, the allegories such as that of the turtle crossing the road.

As the animal makes its tedious way across the dusty thoroughfare, drivers swerve to avoid hitting it. One vicious driver, however, aims directly for it, clearly intending to squash it.

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Once the dust settles and the shock wears off, the turtle emerges and continues on its way, dropping as it does a grain of wheat from the folds of its skin. As the narrative opens, Tom Joad has been released from a prison term he served for having killed someone in self-defense.

On his way home, he falls in with Jim Casy, a former preacher down on his luck. When Jim and Tom get to the farm where the Joads were tenant farmers, they find the place deserted, as are the farms around it, now dusty remnants of what they had been.

Tom learns that his family has sold what little it owned, probably for five cents on the dollar, and headed to the promised land: Tom and Jim catch up with them there, and they all leave—an even dozen of them—for the land in which they have placed their future hope.

Death haunts the motley band, threatening the elderly and those who are weak. The grandfather dies of a stroke the first night out; his wife dies as the family crosses the Mojave Desert. Noah, the retarded son, wanders off and is not heard from again.

Ahead, however, lies hope, so the Joads bury their dead and keep going. The land of their hearts desire, however, proves to be no Garden of Eden. The dream of a future that will offer hope and security quickly develops into a nightmare. She prays over it and sets it adrift in the rushes beside a river.

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Tom gets into trouble with the police, but Jim surrenders in his place and is taken away. By the time Tom and Jim meet again, Jim is a labor agitator.

In an encounter with the police, Jim is killed and Tom is injured. The Joads hide Tom in their shack, then sneak him into a farm. As the rains come, the Joads, who are encamped beside a river, endure floods that ruin their old truck.

Having no place to live, they go into a decrepit barn, where a boy and his starving father have sought shelter. Rose of Sharon, having lost her baby, nourishes the starving man with the milk from her breasts, thereby saving his life.

One is reminded again of the turtle and of the grain of wheat it deposits in the desiccated soil. The Grapes of Wrath is a bitter tale of humans against nature and against a brutally exploitive society, but it is also a tale of nobility, of self-sacrifice, and ultimately of hope.In the novel The Grapes of Wrath, author John Steinbeck conveys the connection people have with their land, how big, greedy, corporations take that away, and how family unity provides the strength to overcome the hardships that are set in place by the corporations.

. The Grapes of Wrath is most memorable as the story of the Joad family’s trek across Depression-era America. The long narrative chapters that trace their journey provide a personal context for understanding the more abstract social, historical, and symbolic musings of the shorter alternating chapters.

The Grapes of Wrath, John Steinbeck’s masterpiece, is a starkly realistic rendition of the Depression-era struggle of an Oklahoma farm family forced to move to California in order to find.

In the novel The Grapes of Wrath, author John Steinbeck conveys the connection people have with their land, how big, greedy, corporations take that away, and how family unity provides the strength to overcome the hardships that are set in place by the corporations.

All humans think of a home as a place for comfort. The Grapes of Wrath and Freytag's Pyramid. John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath is the story of dispossessed tenant farmers, the Joads, who are forced to migrate west to find work.

To some readers.

An analysis of the hardships in the novel grapes of wrath by john steinbeck

The Grapes of Wrath, describes the difficulty of migrant labors during the Great ashio-midori.comn by, John Steinbeck, this novel went on to receive many awards. Generally viewed as Steinbeck’s best and most striving novel, The Grapes of Wrath was published in Stating the story of an expelled Oklahoma family and their fight to form a reestablished life in California at the peak of the.

SparkNotes: The Grapes of Wrath